Frequently Asked Questions

Information for Veterinarians


What is the preferred blood component for _____?

Condition or Indication Product
of First Choice
Product
of Second Choice
Anemia Packed Red Cells (RBC’s) Whole Blood
Anti Vitamin K Intoxication Frozen Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma
Blood Loss Packed Red Cells (RBC’s) Fresh Whole Blood
DIC

Cryoprecipitate Fresh Frozen Plasma
Disfibrinogenemia Hypofibrinogenemia Cryoprecipitate Fresh Frozen Plasma
Factor VII deficiency

Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma
Factor X deficiency

Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma
Hemophila B

Frozen Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma
Hemophilia A

Cryoprecipitate Fresh Frozen Plasma
Hemophilia C

Frozen Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma
Hemorrhage, Massive

Fresh Whole Blood Fresh Frozen Plasma
Hypoproteinemia (Renal Disease,
Malnutrition, Liver Disease)
Intravenous colloid Plasma
Parvovirus Infection

Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma
Prothrombin Deficiency

Cryoprecipitate Fresh Frozen Plasma
Sepsis Cryosupernatant Plasma Plasma
Von Willebrand's
Disease
Cryoprecipitate Fresh Frozen Plasma
Warfarin Poisoning

Plasma Fresh Frozen Plasma

What is the difference between Fresh Frozen Plasma and Plasma?

Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) contains all blood clotting factors including the heat labile Factors V and VIII. Fresh Frozen Plasma is used to treat a suspected or known deficiency or malfunction in clotting Factors V and VIII. It is also used to replace all clotting factors if a patient has had a massive bleed where its total blood volume has been replaced in less than 24 hours. Fresh Frozen Plasma is also used to treat disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Plasma contains all blood clotting factors with reduced amount of the heat labile Factors V and VIII.

Both Fresh Frozen Plasma and Plasma can be used to treat conditions such as parvovirus infection, coumarin/warfarin toxicosis, albumin replacement and passive immunity to orphaned neonates.


What are the clinically significant canine blood types?

DEA Group Presence of Naturally Occurring Antibodies? Transfusion Significance
1.1 No Clinically significant antibody – may cause an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction.
1.2 No Clinically significant antibody – may cause an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction.
3 Yes Possible delayed reaction. No hemolysis of red blood cells.
4 No None
5 Yes Possible delayed reaction. No hemolysis of red blood cells.
7 Yes Possible delayed reaction. No hemolysis of red blood cells.

What are the artifacts floating in the blood bag?

In is perfectly normal for some artifacts to develop during the storage of blood components. Please refer to the chart below to help you determine if the artifacts you are observing are normal or are possible contaminations.

ArtifactWhat is it ?What to do Irregular clumps of white or off-white material

White blood cells and platelet aggregates Use a blood filter when transfusing Regular, entire white bodies

Possible bacteria colonies DO NOT USE THIS UNIT. Discard into a biohazard waste container.

Visible haemolysis in the tubing segments or unit Outdated or contaminated with bacteria
DO NOT USE THIS UNIT. Discard into a biohazard waste comtainer

White flecks or “chips” Fat Fat will dissolve into solution as the unit is warmed.

WHOLE BLOOD & PACKED RED CELLS (RBC’S)
Layer of white or off-white material floating on top White blood cells and platelet aggregates Use a blood filter when transfusing

FRESH FROZEN PLASMA (FFP)
Artifact What is it ? What to do
Whitish stringy material Precipitated coagulation Factor VIII and fibrinogens Caused by thawing the unit in the fridge rather than in a 37° C water bath. Will be removed by blood filter.

PLASMA AND FRESH FROZEN PLASMA
Artifact What is it ? What to do
Milky white in color when thawed Fat Safe to transfuse.
Regular, entire
white bodies
Possible bacteria colonies DO NOT USE THIS UNIT. Discard into a biohazard waste container.
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